Monday, May 26, 2008

Tribute to Mr. C and family~~


Lou Gherig's or ALS......something I have seen often in my nursing career but for whatever reason this particular case has touched my heart so deeply....so I am sharing some information for those interested please read....MR. C......YOU HAVE INSPIRED ME, YOU HAVE GIVEN ME STRENGTH IN YOUR TIME OF WEAKNESS, YOU HAVE TAUGHT ME COMPASSION, WHEN I THOUGHT I WAS ALREADY COMPASSIONATE, YOU HAVE TAUGHT ME COURAGE IN THE FACE OF DEATH, YOU HAVE TAUGHT ME PATIENCE WHEN I FEEL THE NEED TO RUSH, MOST OF ALL YOU HAVE SHOWN ME THE IMPORTANCE OF LOVE, RESPECT AND WISDOM NOT TAUGHT IN BOOKS....YOU HAVE SHOWN ME THE KIND AND GENTLE SOUL YOU ARE AND FOR THIS I THANK YOU FROM THE BOTTOM OF MY HEART.......


At the onset of ALS the symptoms may be so slight that they are frequently overlooked. With regard to the appearance of symptoms and the progression of the illness, the course of the disease may include the following:
muscle weakness in one or more of the following: hands, arms, legs or the muscles of speech, swallowing or breathing
twitching (fasciculation) and cramping of muscles, especially those in the hands and feet
impairment of the use of the arms and legs
"thick speech" and difficulty in projecting the voice
in more advanced stages, shortness of breath, difficulty in breathing and swallowing
The initial symptoms of ALS can be quite varied in different people. One person may experience tripping over carpet edges, another person may have trouble lifting and a third person's early symptom may be slurred speech. The rate at which ALS progresses can be quite variable from one person to another. Although the mean survival time with ALS is three to five years, many people live five, ten or more years. In a small number of people, ALS is known to remit or halt its progression, though there is no scientific understanding as to how and why this happens. Symptoms can begin in the muscles of speech, swallowing or in the hands, arms, legs or feet. Not all people with ALS experience the same symptoms or the same sequences or patterns of progression. But, progressive muscle weakness and paralysis are universally experienced.Muscle weakness is a hallmark initial sign in ALS, occurring in approximately 60% of patients. Early symptoms vary with each individual, but usually include tripping, dropping things, abnormal fatigue of the arms and/or legs, slurred speech, muscle cramps and twitches and/or uncontrollable periods of laughing or crying.The hands and feet may be affected first, causing difficulty in lifting, walking or using the hands for the activities of daily living such as dressing, washing and buttoning clothes.As the weakening and paralysis continue to spread to the muscles of the trunk of the body the disease, eventually affects speech, swallowing, chewing and breathing. When the breathing muscles become affected, ultimately, the patient will need permanent ventilatory support in order to survive.Since ALS attacks only motor neurons, the sense of sight, touch, hearing, taste and smell are not affected. For many people, muscles of the eyes and bladder are generally not affected. Most people affected with this disease do not survive more than 5 years after being diagnosed........................................

6 comments:

Donna said...

French! That was so moving and at the same token so very informative! Each time I read your blog... I learn something new about something of interest or something important! Thank you!

twintoo10292 said...

What a horrible disease and so sad to watch someone suffer through it. Have you read or seen the movie Tuesdays With Maury? That is what your story reminds me of. Some times we wonder why God would allow this to happen but maybe it's for someone like you to be touched in a way that is almost unspeakable and then to pass a lesson on to others. Thanks so much for such an honest-heartfelt-personal story and reap not only the sadness but the joy of getting to be a part of that persons life. And don't kid yourself Lisa, I'm sure you touched his heart too. Twin

Rue said...

I read about this at Gollums. Such a tragic, yet touching story.

hugs,
rue

Anonymous said...

Hi French, I have actually come to your blog before but felt as if I was prying because I had not been "invited".:o) I am still learning the rules of etiquette for blogging. Thanks for visiting me, I am appreciative and do hope you will return. I saw where you had written about this on Gollum's blog. Things like this remind me how blessed we all are and to remember GOD IS, GOD DOES and GOD CAN. My prayers are with this man and his Family. Thanks again.

Tiffany
"caniquitmyjobanddecorate"

Ladydeembee said...

Dearest French!!! I just dropped in to say hello... and read your wonderful posts again!!! :) Donna

Elizabeth said...

That was so informative, yet struck my heart at the same time. ALS is one of my greatest fears, even as a 3-time cancer survivor myself. Thank you for sharing information that everyone should know.

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Never say what if... Just do. Live life without regrets...RN /Author/Interior Decorator